Why Don’t We (You) Do More, More Often?

I always feel fortunate to have such passionate Doctors and Team Members who really care and take what you all do very seriously.  They want to get better and keep growing and learning.

This provides me the great privilege of being your fearless leader along the way to inspire, guide, challenge, push, motivate and invigorate you to be your best self.  You never settle because you know there are always more patients you can help get healthy.

Still, when I send out an interactive contest and ‘practice-improvement’ challenge, I’m always impressed by the amazing feedback and participation.

THANK YOU.

Of course, it’s always the best who participates.  Being engaged and successful go hand-in-hand.  Those most focused and dedicated to growth in themselves lead to growth in all other areas of their lives.

What surprises me though is that more don’t… do something, do anything, pay attention, do the work necessary to win – and then they complain about their results (or lack thereof), and their plot in life and dentistry.  They are dependent on everyone for everything and take no responsibility for themselves.  Thank goodness that isn’t you.

It is funny though (maybe more sad than funny), who does and who doesn’t.  Perhaps the team just doesn’t care because they don’t see enough ambition in the doctor; that lacking enthusiasm for dentistry, care in diagnosis and attention with patient discussions.

It is hard for any team member to sustain a desire to win and do well when the leader doesn’t live this day in and day out, and all the time in between.

That’s why winning isn’t easy.  It’s not for the faint at heart.  It takes real grit, determination, fight.

I thank those who participated in the clutter exercise and sent me truly incredible lists, concerns and areas of improvement.  Oddly enough, those that didn’t are most certainly the ones who have the most to improve (and are probably oblivious to it).

I hate to say that I didn’t expect all the responses that I got – but I didn’t.  Which means I have a lot more to sort through and study than I anticipated.  So we’ll continue our Team Driven Huddle Series soon…the goal is next week.  You will be receiving your prizes and surprises from my Team in the coming weeks as we build up to the big 2nd quarter finale.

I’m excited by what I’ve read so far and still dozens and dozens to go through.  You are certainly in for some very valuable information, all requested by one of you.

So, today’s Huddle, it should be a wakeup call.

Why does it take so long to notice things that are less than ideal in your practice?

Why does it take so long to train someone?

Why does it take so long to improve and pay attention to the highest areas of focus and priorities that actually matter?

Too busy being busy maybe.

Too distracted to know what’s what.

Too complacent to care.

I don’t know.

But you do have to ask yourself: why don’t you do healthy things more often that put your behaviors in alignment with the goals and objectives, the outcomes and results, you say you want.  Not just in your practice but in your life.

Asking tough questions about and of yourself is the first big step that champions learn to embrace – and not being afraid of the answer – this is the key to winning.

And if you are doing it right, the pain of change and acting on these type of questions is worth the rewards that come as result of the improvements you make.

Never forget this saying.  I have probably told it to you before.  It is the mantra of all the greats…

THE BIGGEST ROOM IN THE WORLD IS THE ROOM FOR IMPROVEMENT

The time spent in that room, you guessed it, the more improvement that is made.  Self-critical in a healthy way leads to self-improvement in the best way.

Prepare yourself.  It’s going to be fun…

And why not, one more chance, to join in by submitting your list from last week’s huddle assignment.

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